Newkirk, a wise, personable presence with a sense of humor, roots his study in characters on the ground, introducing us to locals including a Treme evacuee, a Charity Hospital nurse, and a “smooth, ageless” Seventh Ward booster. Discover online now. To revisit this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories. The series is enhanced by John DeLore’s excellent sound design, which includes a lovely, subtle score and the sounds of children singing about church elders. In “Nice White Parents,” from Serial Productions and the Times, Chana Joffe-Walt presents the history of a single middle school in Brooklyn, using its story to illustrate the ways in which white parents, often unwittingly and under a cloak of “innocence” or naïveté, have contributed to structural inequality while trying to improve educational opportunities for their own kids. Listen to The New Yorker: Fiction podcast for free on radio.net. Politics and More. Many highly produced narrative-nonfiction podcasts seek to succeed both as journalism and art; this one achieves it. Listen to The New Yorker: Politics and More episodes free, on demand. 9/1/2020. Joy Harjo Reads Sandra Cisneros. Now, you may not have the glands.” Shriver insisted that he did—“I’ve got plenty of glands.”) The series came out before Super Tuesday, when various domestic-policy proposals were being cheered and scorned; as we head into the Biden era (!) Here are nine of our very favorite episodes, all available for free on iTunes or streaming online. Deborah Treisman’s discussions are a … David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. In the course of American history, many political parties have perished. A monthly reading and conversation with the New Yorker fiction editor Deborah Treisman.Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios. The season begins with a museum’s collection of creepy dolls and its role in the preservation of fashion in postwar France; it goes on to consider ideas about beauty, value, and specialness with episodes about knockoffs (via the influential Harlem designer Dapper Dan), diamonds, suits, perfume, and wedding dresses. Kristen Roupenian Reads Shirley Jackson. 181.fm - Christmas Classics . Atul Gawande on Taming the Coronavirus. Photo Credit Nancy Crampton. Fortunately, this year brought us “Anthem: Homunculus,” Mitchell’s musical podcast, from Topic and Luminary, with songs by Bryan Weller, which riffs on smartphones, “palliative democracy,” and crowdsourced medical care, and which regularly produces gems like “In the future, everyone will be anonymous for fifteen minutes.” It ventures discursively, “Hedwig” style, through hilarious stories and moving fables, some of which Mitchell draws from his own life and transmutes, miraculously, into a weird and wonderful alloy. Radical Imagination: Tracy K. Smith, Marilyn Nelson, and Terrance Hayes on Poetry in Our Times. It’s elegantly produced, full of funny tape (Ratliff’s former agent fondly tells him that, like James Earl Jones, he has “a voice you could eat tomato soup to”), and insightful; every time we think Ratliff is veering toward self-centered neurosis, he pulls the frame back to make his story universal again, in ways we might not want to admit. May 1, 2020 • Kristen Roupenian joins Deborah Treisman … New daily-news shows arose beside the stalwarts; impeachment podcasts sprang up. The show’s writing, acting, and audio production are expertly done—“old” audio clips actually sound old, and a little distorted—and it doesn’t telegraph the jokes, which sneak up and pack a punch. Amer and Damon narrate the tale of a changing American community through vivid characters and audio: unnerving 911 calls from Elon Musk’s Tesla Gigafactory, rancorous city-council meetings, private-eye stakeouts, activism within a residential hotel, and salty straight talk from the strip-club kingpin Kamy Keshmiri. Written and performed by the poet and critic Hanif Abdurraqib, “Lost Notes: 1980,” the new season of KCRW’s music-documentary podcast, revisits unexpected moments in pop music—a posthumous album from Minnie Riperton; the concurrent deaths of Darby Crash, of the Germs, and John Lennon; the self-reinvention of Grace Jones; the mainstreaming of rap—during that single, transformational year. The powerful “1619” podcast, part of the 1619 Project, from the New York Times, begins on the coast of Point Comfort, in Hampton, Virginia, where, four hundred years ago, in a ship called the White Lion, enslaved African people arrived for the first time in what became the United States. None of these thirty-six films has made a difference in the nation’s crises this year—but inner truth of experience and authenticity of emotion are, in and of themselves, cleansing to a defiled mediasphere. (Like the Jeffrey Epstein saga, learning about it can make you feel like a conspiracy theorist.) “Nice White Parents,” “Fiasco: The Battle for Boston,” “The Promise”. 2020 ‎Readings and conversation with The New Yorker's poetry editor, Kevin Young. This year, Avery Trufelman, a longtime reporter and producer for “99% Invisible” and the current host of “The Cut,” returned with the second season of her limited series “Articles of Interest,” which not only continued to engage me with a topic I’d never thought I cared much about—clothing—but changed the way I thought about, of all things, luxury. Joy Harjo Reads Sandra Cisneros. The final episode, featuring enraging audio from an exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Newkirk’s interview with the notorious former FEMA director Michael (“Heckuva job”) Brown, is stunning in its power and restraint. Tiana Clark joins Kevin Young to read and discuss Natasha Trethewey's poem "Repentance," and her own poem, "Nashville." A Nobel Laureate on the Politics of Fighting the Coronavirus. Joy Harjo Reads Sandra Cisneros. The parallels with broader Democratic Party conflicts give the story an unnerving resonance. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. After a couple of partly brilliant, partly cringe-inducing seasons (the empathetic but stalkerish “Missing Richard Simmons”; the ambitious and unnervingly confessional “Surviving Y2K”), the producer Dan Taberski, creator-host of the series “Headlong,” knocked it out of the park with “Running from ‘Cops,’ ” which ventures deep into the world of TV’s longest-running reality show and reveals startling truths about policing, perceptions, TV, and American justice. ‎Readings and conversation with The New Yorker's poetry editor, Kevin Young. In the first episode, we hear audio of young kids playing “Cops”: “Get down on the ground, now! In it, the character actor and improv-comedy veteran Connor Ratliff (“The Chris Gethard Show,” “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”) examines a discomfiting milestone in his life—hearing that Hanks had him fired because he has “dead eyes”—and gets peers and friends (including Tony Hale, Jon Hamm, Aimee Mann, D’Arcy Carden, and Mike Birbiglia) to reflect on career successes and failures alongside him. What our staff is reading, watching, and listening to each week. Merriman’s evocation of the night the Berlin Wall went up is particularly stunning—houses divided in half, families on opposite sides. The quality of the series’ reporting and storytelling is matched by its music, by Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah and Anthony Braxton, and sound design, by David Herman; its coming-of-the-hurricane moment is the most beautiful audio sequence I heard this year. What a surprise it was to listen to the satirical investigative podcast “This Sounds Serious: Grand Casino,” from Castbox and the Vancouver production company Kelly & Kelly, and laugh my head off over and over again. To revisit this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories. Atul Gawande, a New Yorker staff writer who was recently appointed to President-elect Joe Biden’s COVID-19 task force, walks David Remnick through some of the challenges of this pivotal moment. BTS and other stars have taken off in America. The New Yorker fiction editor reads and discusses “Good People,” by David Foster Wallace, from a 2007 issue of the magazine. For the New Yorker's Poetry Podcast, hosted by Kevin Young, Margaret Atwood chose to read and discuss Saeed Jones's poem, "A Stranger," as well as her own poem, "Flatline." The Best Podcasts of 2020. 105'5 Spreeradio Livestream. Oct 9, 2020. F.D.A. Ad Choices. The weekly podcast of Chicago Carless-The Life and Times of a Former New Yorker Living in Downtown Chicago, hosted by Mike Doyle. 40 talking about this. “ This Sounds Serious: Grand Casino ”. On a special episode of the podcast, taped live, editors from The New York Times Book Review discuss this year’s outstanding fiction and nonfiction. The New Yorker: The Writer's Voice - New Fiction from The New Yorker WNYC Studios and The New Yorker More ways to shop: Find an Apple Store or other retailer near you. At the 2020 New Yorker Festival, earlier this month, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Elizabeth Warren joined Andrew Marantz to talk about the Presidential race, and how Joe Biden should lead if he wins the election. Readings and conversation with The New Yorker's poetry editor, Kevin Young. on the year’s best. Throughout, Parton’s music and mellifluous speaking voice make for the best, most joyful listening experience of the year. The director’s new project reflects his upbringing in West Indian London. The New Yorker: Poetry bölümünü yetmiş yedi bölümü ücretsiz dinle! (“These are the things that Uncle Roy has taught us. The best podcasts often help us see something anew—“Cops,” sleep, an old Moby album—and, to the surprise of many of us, this year that included “Wind of Change,” the 1990 perestroika-focussed power ballad by the German hair-metal band the Scorpions, whose piercing whistle and anthemic force inspired millions of Soviet and European “children of tomorrow” to “ring the freedom bell.” The podcast “Wind of Change,” from the New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, Pineapple Street Studios, Spotify, and Crooked Media, investigates a juicy rumor: was the C.I.A. Üyelik veya indirme gerekmez. The Battle Over Portland. The podcasts that stood out to me most this year, not surprisingly, were those that transported me—especially when they made me laugh. As I noted in a recent column about impeachment podcasts, “Trump, Inc.,” is among the most useful podcasts to provide clarity and perspective on all things Parnas, Fruman, and “perfect,” especially in its episodes “Ukraine,” in which Marritz travels to Kyiv, and “The Diplomat, the Machers, and the Oligarch.” There’s something oddly reassuring about the good-natured level-headedness with which Bernstein and Marritz guide us through the swamp and into, say, the Doral resort, where Donald Trump, Jr., is cheerfully riffing with a crowd chanting about a Hunter Biden conspiracy theory. Episodes; Segments; About; Team; Listen The Chef Bryant Terry on How To “Blackify” Fennel. Listen to 78 episodes of The New Yorker: Poetry on Podbay - the best podcast player on the web. The cultural-history podcast “You’re Wrong About” is a sort of Schadenfreude theatre; you hear someone get absolutely schooled, in real time, as … Elvis Costello Talks with David Remnick. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios. © 2020 Condé Nast. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. But the show has also built up such reserves of listener trust and reportorial skill that it can branch out into less Internet-focussed narratives, including, this month, a three-part series by the producer Emmanuel Dzotsi (of “Serial” Season 3), about a fateful leadership battle in the Alabama Democratic Party, captured at a moment that changes everything. The powerful “1619” podcast, part of the 1619 Project, from the New York Times, begins on the coast of Point Comfort, in Hampton, Virginia, where, four hundred years ago, in … Ben Purkert joins .” Purkert began contributing po. Joy Harjo Reads Sandra Cisneros. The pieces that drove the most subscriptions this year are useful for understanding what our audience values most—not just what readers are willing to pay for but what sparks a lasting relationship with them. The cultural-history podcast “You’re Wrong About” is a sort of Schadenfreude theatre; you hear someone get absolutely schooled, in real time, as they make the journey from ignorance to insight. Bonus and ad-free content available with Stitcher Premium. The easiest way to listen to podcasts on your iPhone, iPad, Android, PC, smart speaker – and even in your car. Kristen Roupenian Reads Shirley Jackson. Six experts talk about what makes their music so appealing. What music will forever be “pandemic music,” and what music will carry over with the best music of other years into the great historical record? A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden. In March, Covid-specific series sprang up—the one I liked best was a nearly robotic, just-the-facts situation called “Coronavirus 411”—and, as the pandemic set in, many shows made great use of the power of voices to connect listeners in isolation. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more. Early on, we visit the garden of a woman named Karen Fraser, who lives on a quiet side street in Toronto; she points out her flower beds, the “tulips and daffodils along here, lots of periwinkle,” which, Ling says, were “designed and maintained by her faithful gardener, Bruce.” That gardener, Bruce McArthur, had killed eight men, six of them immigrants of color; their remains were found in and around Fraser’s yard, the site of the largest forensic investigation in Toronto police history. I also appreciated shows that gave me useful information in a form I could stand. Podcasts The New Yorker Radio Hour. Anna Shechtman and Erik Agard, two New Yorker crossword creators, discuss the best clues of the year, how mainstream vocabulary steals from drag culture, and their vision for crossword mania in 2020. Christmas Stations Christmas Stations. © 2020 Condé Nast. In the plucky and revealing “Richest Hill,” from Montana Public Radio, the reporter-host Nora Saks alchemizes a Superfund hot spot into audio gold. - News podcast from United States A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden. Carly Pope, playing Gwen Radford, a podcaster obsessed with 911 calls, narrates with intelligence and clarity; the series pokes fun at podcast conventions, and even specific podcasts, but rarely overplays its hand. And the second season of Meribah Knight’s “The Promise,” from Nashville Public Radio, employs the investigative thoroughness she demonstrated in the show’s first season, about inequity surrounding the redevelopment of a Nashville public-housing project, and directs it toward the study of two vastly unequal neighborhood schools. For free. Non sono richiesti download o registrazioni. As the episodes unfold, Saks weaves in history (sounds of a long-dormant hoisting engine), music (“Solidarity Forever,” fiddling), and colorful characters into this story of environmental horrors and federal bureaucracy, and in doing so brings a community vividly to life for listeners who may not know anything about it, or about the role that the advent of telephones played in the creation of a toxic-water site. Though it takes the form of a romp, mightily enhanced by the production chops of Henry Molofsky, “Wind of Change” gets us thinking about the role of culture, and specifically music, in influencing hearts and minds. Support Us. All prices are in U.S. dollars. Each … (Recurring segments like “Yes Yes No” and “Super Tech Support,” which are at once breezy and brainy, help, too.) Via frivolous drug arrests, setups, constant talk of “bad guys,” and even its inescapable theme song (“Bad Boys”), “Cops” has shaped its viewers’ perceptions of police work—and, in some ways, influenced police work itself. Listen to The New Yorker Poetry Podcast podcast for free on radio.net. When the series made its début, in 2018, with a season about a weatherman murdered in his waterbed, some listeners mistook it for true crime. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. The series sets out to trace the progress of a Superfund cleanup deal in real time; recently—spoiler alert—some progress has been made. Ascolta The New Yorker: Poetry con settantasette episodi gratis! All podcasts and radio stations at one glance. To revisit this article, select My⁠ ⁠Account, then View saved stories. Apr 1, 2020 Listen 34 min F.D.A. and resume such debates, it’s well worth a listen. 181.fm - Christmas Mix. Radical Imagination: Tracy K. Smith, Marilyn Nelson, and Terrance Hayes on Poetry in Our Times. . This was a year in which you really noticed a good laugh—what is this sound, this feeling?—and appreciated the hell out of it. There, and throughout, the project’s creator and the series’ host, Nikole Hannah-Jones, brings us up close to the sounds and images of American history, sparking empathetic recognition through audio, including archival recordings. Our Podcasts Support Us The New Yorker Radio Hour. The New Yorker cultural correspondent Sarah Larson’s commentary on podcasts, including “Invisibilia,” “S-Town,” “Serial,” and more. Ben Purkert Reads Jorie Graham. Disclaimer: The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from WNYC Studios and The New Yorker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc. Dianne Feinstein and the Perils of an Aging Leadership. They spent four and a half years reporting on a community of fundamentalist, polygamist Mormons in Short Creek, on the Utah-Arizona border, the leader of which, Warren Jeffs, is now serving a life sentence for sexually assaulting a minor. The cultural-history podcast “You’re Wrong About” is a sort of Schadenfreude theatre; you hear someone get absolutely schooled, in real time, as … – Listen to The New Yorker: Fiction instantly on your tablet, phone or browser - no downloads needed. The year’s most amusing podcast intro—the unmistakable voice of Bebe Neuwirth saying, “This is ‘Dead Eyes,’ a podcast about one actor’s quest to find out why Tom Hanks fired him from a small role in the 2001 HBO miniseries ‘Band of Brothers’ ”—is perfectly emblematic of the charm, self-awareness, and star power of this surprisingly edifying series. In exploring how our desires can manifest themselves “in strange and seemingly frivolous ways,” Trufelman illustrates how essential those desires truly are. Each series makes excellent use of telling detail, vivid scene-setting, and lively interview tape from parents, politicians, and students. … “Tunnel 29,” from BBC Radio 4’s “Intrigue” series, tells the story of Joachim Rudolph, who, in 1961 and 1962, as a young engineering student, dug a tunnel between West and East Berlin and helped twenty-nine people escape communist East Germany. An irreverent look at life, love, and … The easiest way to listen to podcasts on your iPhone, iPad, Android, PC, smart speaker – and even in your car. Listen to The New Yorker: Politics And More with 150 episodes, free! Anmeldung oder Installation nicht notwendig. Non sono richiesti download o registrazioni. … In a special podcast episode, hear Toni Morrison talk about the media industry, her childhood, and her relationship with her family, from an interview in 2015. Listen to The New Yorker: Politics and More episodes free, on demand. At the 2020 New Yorker Festival, this month, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Elizabeth Warren joined Andrew Marantz to talk about the Presidential race and how Joe Biden should lead if he wins the election. Excellent listening and insight from authors and editor. Every month, renowned authors pick a story from the magazine’s archives, read it aloud and discuss it with Treisman. The New Yorker: Politics and More podcast on demand - A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden. Listen here, or wherever you get your podcasts. Reno, thanks to companies like Tesla and Google, is undergoing a tech boom, which has driven a real-estate frenzy that local officials want to embrace, in hope of phasing out the era when Reno was known for strip clubs and quickie divorces.
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